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Evergreens and Ridgewood

I took a van of explorers from NYC Audubon out to Brooklyn and Queens for a morning at historic Cemetery of the Evergreens, followed by a stroll around Ridgewood Reservoir. We were met at the Cemetery by historian Danny Daddario whose knowledge of the place and the people buried there is so prodigious and so fluently delivered, that had we seen no birds, we would have had a very enjoyable day. As it was, we had some late warblers, some early sparrows, and great looks at the birds that the cemetery has become somewhat famous for: raptors – Cooper’s Hawk, a Merlin, and an American Kestrel (the Peregrines were taking a break). We also made a game of hunting for birds among the tombstones. Thanks to some keen eyes and sharp wits, we had a Forester’s (tern), a Martin, a Swan, a Jaeger, and a Guan.

We then drove over to Ridgewood. The Red-eyed Vireo is one of my favorite common birds, and we got a few more warblers and sparrows. Lots of swallows wheeling over the water, and after several moments of careful observation and discussion, we concluded that they were Northern Rough-winged Swallows, a late date for this species. It’s been a dry and warm fall, so who knows?

Don’t miss a chance to bird either of these locations. Danny will give you a tour that will open your eyes to episodes in New York City history that are colorful and important: battles in the Revolutionary War, the sinking of the Slocum, and much more. Meanwhile, he’s patient enough to put his stories on pause while you ooh and ahh over a Black-throated Blue Warbler. And then get out to Ridgewood. The birding is decent, and the reservoir’s future is uncertain, so don’t invite a regret.

We then drove over to Ridgewood. The Red-eyed Vireo is one of my favorite common birds, and we got a few more warblers and sparrows. Lots of swallows wheeling over the water, and after several moments of careful observation and discussion, we concluded that they were Northern Rough-winged Swallows, a late date for this species. It’s been a dry and warm fall, so who knows?

Don’t miss a chance to bird either of these locations. Danny will give you a tour that will open your eyes to episodes in New York City history that are colorful and important: battles in the Revolutionary War, the sinking of the Slocum, and much more. Meanwhile, he’s patient enough to put his stories on pause while you ooh and ahh over a Black-throated Blue Warbler. And then get out to Ridgewood. The birding is decent, and the reservoir’s future is uncertain, so don’t invite a regret.

I took a van of explorers from NYC Audubon out to Brooklyn and Queens for a morning at historic Cemetery of the Evergreens, followed by a stroll around Ridgewood Reservoir. We were met at the Cemetery by historian Danny Daddario whose knowledge of the place and the people buried there is so prodigious and so fluently delivered, that had we seen no birds, we would have had a very enjoyable day. As it was, we had some late warblers, some early sparrows, and great looks at the birds that the cemetery has become somewhat famous for: raptors – Cooper’s Hawk, a Merlin, and an American Kestrel (the Peregrines were taking a break). We also made a game of hunting for birds among the tombstones. Thanks to some keen eyes and sharp wits, we had a Forester’s (tern), a Martin, a Swan, a Jaeger, and a Guan.

We then drove over to Ridgewood. The Red-eyed Vireo is one of my favorite common birds, and we got a few more warblers and sparrows. Lots of swallows wheeling over the water, and after several moments of careful observation and discussion, we concluded that they were Northern Rough-winged Swallows, a late date for this species. But, it’s been a dry and warm fall, so who knows?

Don’t miss a chance to bird either of these locations. Danny will give you a tour that will open your eyes to episodes in New York City history that are colorful and important: battles in the Revolutionary War, the sinking of the Slocum, and much more. Meanwhile, he’s patient enough to put his stories on pause while you ooh and ahh over a Black-throated Blue Warbler. And then get out to Ridgewood. The birding is decent, and the reservoir’s future is uncertain, so don’t invite a regret.

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